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Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

1 edition of Case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves found in the catalog.

Case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves

Case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves

To which is added, A vindication of the said representation.

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Published by J. Roberts in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementsigned by the president of the council, and speaker of the house of burgesses ;
ContributionsVirginia (Colony). General Assembly. House of Burgesses.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21769964M

A wealthy planter and local official, Robert Beverly, who was concerned with the legal distinctions between the two classes of servitude, composed The History and Present State of Virginia because he was dissatisfied with a similar book by an English author. The book was an enormous hit and was reprinted several times. Laura Virginia's shift from white indentured servants to African slaves as the main plantation labor force was accelerated by one of the most dramatic con- frontations of this era, Bacon's Rebellion of Governor William Berkeley had for thirty years run a corrupt regime in alliance with an inner circle of the colony's wealthiest tobacco planters.

Early in Virginia's settlement, for example, tobacco could buy a wife for a colonist, who simply paid to pounds of tobacco to choose one of the women shipped over by the Virginia Company. Tobacco Culture: The Mentality of the Great Tidewater Planters on the Eve of Revolution. By T.H. Breen, In his book, Tobacco Culture, T.H Breen attempts to describe how the cultivation of tobacco influenced perceptions, thinking, and values in Tidewater Virginia during the years leading up to the American Revolution. After building a.

Add to Book Bag Remove from Book Bag Saved in: The humble address of the House of Burgesses, to the Honourable William Gooch, Esq; His Majesty's lieutenant-governor and commander in chief of the colony and dominion of Virginia. The Colony of Virginia, chartered in and settled in , was the first enduring English colony in North America, following failed proprietary attempts at settlement on Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey Gilbert in , and the subsequent further south Roanoke Island (modern eastern North Carolina) by Sir Walter Raleigh in the late l: Jamestown (–), Williamsburg .


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Case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves Download PDF EPUB FB2

[virginia tobacco] The Case of the Planters of Tobacco in Virginia, as Represented by Themselves: Signed by the President of the Council, and Speaker of the House of Burgesses. To Which is Added, a Vindication of the Said Representation.

Pamphlet, The case of planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves, signed by the president of the council and speaker of the House of Burgesses ([London: Printed for J. Roberts in Warwick Lane]), The case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, &c.

[signed in the name and behalf of the council, Robert Carter, president; John Holloway, speaker of the House of Burgesses, Williamsburg, J ]: p. A vindication of the representation of the planters of tobacco in Virginia: made by the General assembly of that colony: p. The case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, &c.

[signed in the name and behalf of the council, Robert Carter, president; John Holloway, speaker of the House of Burgesses, Williamsburg.

The case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves [microform] / signed by the president of the council, and the speaker of the House of Burgesses ; Case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia which is added, A vindication of the said representation Printed for J.

Roberts London The Case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves [electronic resource] signed by the president of the council, and speaker of the House of Burgesses; to which is added a vindication of the said representation. The Case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves [electronic resource]: signed by the president of the council and speaker of the House of Burgesses.

By Abstract. This excerpt from The History of Virginia by Robert Beverley Jr. encompasses all of Book Four, Chap in which the author describes the institutions of slavery and indentured servitude in Virginia.

He defends the institutions from naysayers, paying special attention to the legal rights of servants. Eventually the Virginia Assembly re-instituted an export duty on tobacco in an effort to encourage planters to produce more foodstuffs and less of the “weed.” Planters who found themselves in increasingly difficult circumstances resulting from the loss of income from their usual cash crop, slave desertions, and the generally depressed.

Tobacco played a transformative role in the colonies. Both the crown and colonial planters grew rich from the sales of tobacco to the ever-expanding mass market in Europe. As such, it became Virginia's substitute for gold.

William Byrd II. Gentry in Colonial Virginia. Contributed by Albert H. Tillson Jr. The gentry were a small class of men who dominated the economic, social, and political life of Virginia through much of the mid- to late eighteenth century.

Of landed but not noble lineage, the gentry established themselves in Virginia as tobacco planters relying heavily on the labor first of indentured. The case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves Published: () An epistle to all professors in New-England, Germany, and other parts of the called Christian vvorld: also to the Jews and Turks throughout the world: that they may see who are the true worshippers of God, that he seeks, and in what he is worshipped.

OCLC Number: Notes: Vindication attributed to Sir John Randolph by Goldsmiths' Lib. cat. The case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, &c. [signed in the name and behalf of the council, Robert Carter, president; John Holloway, speaker of the. increasing amount of tobacco-supply depressed tobacco prices in European markets.

Cheap tobacco reduced planter's profits and made saving enough to become landowners more difficult for freed servants. Mortality Rate declined. More servants survived their indentures and landless freeman became more numerous and grew more discontented 3.

The cultivation of tobacco soon spread from John Rolfe's garden to every available plot of ground within the fortified districts in Jamestown. By the value of tobacco was well known in every settlement or plantation in Virginia--Bermuda, Dale's Gift, Henrico, Jamestown, Kecoughtan, and West and Shirley Hundreds--each under a commander.

Slavery in Virginia dates tosoon after the founding of Virginia as an English colony by the London Virginia company established a headright system to encourage colonists to transport indentured servants to the colony for labor; they received a certain amount of land for people whose passage they paid to Virginia.

In slave traders forced Africans to get on a slave ship. William Byrd II (–) was a Virginia planter and author. He briefly sat in the House of Burgesses and served on the Governor's Council for 35 years.

He was the son of William Byrd, a wealthy tobacco planter, fur trader, and the owner of more t acres. Tobacco may have made the smoker carefree, but it certainly was responsible for many a wrinkle on the brow of a planter in Virginia.

Tobacco was a finicky crop which required a large work force, an experienced overseer with excellent judgment, a sizable acreage and a certain amount of plain good luck. The planters eventually came to realize the value of handling tobacco with care, for when good tobacco land became less plentiful, other means of improving the quality of tobacco became necessary.

By most of the tobacco was shipped in hogsheads, but it was not until that the shipment of bulk tobacco was prohibited. The Case of the Planters of Tobacco in Virginia as represented by Themselves; signed by the President of the Council, and Speakers of the House of Burgesses. The Case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves signed by the president of the council, and speaker of the House of burgesses: to which is added, A vindication of the said representation.

Published: () Trust in tobacco: the Anglo-American struggle for. Related titles include: The Case of the planters of tobacco in Virginia, as represented by themselves signed by the president of the council, and speaker of the House of Burgesses; to which is added a vindication of the said representation External and "A Reply to the Vindication of the Representation of the Case of the Planters of Tobacco in Virginia.".The tobacco, which was worth approximately £18 when sold in England, was to cover the cost (£12) of transporting each woman to Virginia, with £6 profit for the Virginia Company’s pocket.

However, as the original estimated cost to outfit each woman stood at £8 (money that was invested by shareholders), the Virginia Company was mostly.